Além das Caricaturas: Nazismo, Racismo e Ciências Raciais (1924-1936) | Beyond Caricatures: Nazism, Racism and Racial Sciences (1924-1936)
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Keywords

nazism
racism
pseudoscience
science
totalitarianism

How to Cite

Varajidás, H. (2022). Além das Caricaturas: Nazismo, Racismo e Ciências Raciais (1924-1936) | Beyond Caricatures: Nazism, Racism and Racial Sciences (1924-1936). Political Observer | Revista Portuguesa De Ciência Política, (16). https://doi.org/10.33167/2184-2078.RPCP2021.16/pp.49-68

Abstract

This article brings forth, organizes and interprets a compound of historical-empirical evidence that allows questioning of two still standing pillars of Nazism political studies: the assumption that the racial aspect of nazi ideology enjoyed a relatively monolithic interpretation within the nazi movement; and the assumption that, after the conquest of power, the nazi Party-State conspired to unilaterally impose such “ideological dogma”, both in theory and practice, on German University and German society. Rather than confirm these oft-repeated conventions, we uncover a much more complex, dialectical and dynamic mesh of relationships involving ideology, pseudoscience and racial science within the nazi movement and under the nazi regime.

https://doi.org/10.33167/2184-2078.RPCP2021.16/pp.49-68
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